EDHS News and Updates

News and Updates

EDHS's New Toll Free Number Reflects Brand

Chicago, Illinois -- The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is the governmental agency responsible for creating blocks of toll free phone numbers. Today, there are six toll free codes: 800, 888, 877, 866, 855 and 844. For those of you with an interest in the Eastland Disaster, it is the newest code -- 844 -- that should be more meaningful than the others: There were 844 victims of the Eastland Disaster.


"Survivor Story": Mary and Katherine O'Keeffe

Chicago, Illinois -- Mary O'Keeffe (right) and her daughter Katherine (left) were thrown into the Chicago River when the Eastland capsized on July 24, 1915. The mother and daughter were rescued by the crew of the steamer Petoskey. The newspaper photo shows the two survivors still wrapped in blankets.


Remembering
Colleen Ringel

Chicago, Illinois -- For the past few months, we have featured a weekly story of a survivor of the Eastland Disaster. This week, we would like to change our story to a different type of survivor -- a cancer survivor, who recently lost her battle when it returned. Colleen Ann Ringel was a dear friend and Eastland Disaster advocate. She passed away this past Sunday, September 4.


"Survivor Story": Carl Nork

Chicago, Illinois -- Carl Nork left Sweden and came to America in 1912. He landed in Boston and got a job there before coming to Chicago. Once in Chicago, he started working for the Western Electric Company in the Sheet Metal Department, or the "Tin Shop" as it was known.


Former Temporary Morgue Demolished After 100 Years

Chicago, Illinois -- The former Second Regiment Armory building that served as the temporary morgue during the Eastland Disaster was demolished last month. Home to the Oprah Winfrey Show (produced by Harpo Studios) since 1990, the building became the location where then Cook County Coroner Peter Hoffman consolidated all of the makeshift morgues that sprung up following the aftermath of the Eastland Disaster. Upwards of 800 bodies were moved to this facility and arranged in rows of 80 for viewing by family members seeking their loved ones who had not returned home.


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